Featured Teaching Kits

Teacher-approved stories, resources, and worksheets for teaching about real teens who changed the world throughout history, courtesy of Junior Scholastic magazine

Mary Beth Tinker Fought for Free Speech

While the Vietnam War raged, many teenagers in America struggled with reports of the violence. One 13-year-old named Mary Beth Tinker decided to do something about it. Her fight for the right to express her views took her all the way to the Supreme Court.

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Tinker v. Des Moines
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How Barbara Johns Helped End Segregation

In 1951, there were 21 American states that required black students and white students to attend separate schools. A young African American girl named Barbara Johns knew this wasn't right—and that she had to do something about it. Her bravery led to a landmark Supreme Court ruling that changed the nation forever. 

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Camella Teoli and the Fight for Workers’ Rights

In the early 20th century, young children across the country were toiling away at dangerous jobs in factories and mills. After suffering a terrible injury on the job, one courageous 12-year-old girl helped change the lives of thousands of American workers.

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"Some Horses Live Better Than We Do"
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Adolfo Kaminsky, A Hero of the Holocaust

Not all the heroes of World War II were soldiers. Find out how a shy Jewish teenager in France risked his life to help thousands of victims escape the Nazis by forging documents.

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Quotes
 

Famous quotes from real teens throughout history

“How wonderful it is that nobody need wait a single moment before starting to improve the world.” 

— Anne Frank

“We realize the importance of our voices only when we are silenced.”

— Malala Yousafzai

“Access to communication in the widest sense is access to knowledge”

— Louis Braille

“I am not afraid. I was born to do this.”

— Joan of Arc

Key Figures
 

Four teens who made an impact on the world

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Louis Braille

A blind French educator born in 1809, who, as a teenager, invented the Braille system of printing and writing for the blind.

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Anne Frank

A Jewish teenager whose diary provides a unique and personal account of Nazi Germany's persecution of the Jews during World War II.

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King Tutankhamen

An Egyptian pharaoh who ruled from age 9 to 19 between the years 1332–1323 B.C. He is one of the most famous Egyptian kings because his tomb was the richest of the few royal burial chambers that survived comparatively intact.  

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Malala Yousafzai

An advocate of female education in Pakistan and the youngest Nobel Prize laureate in history.

Glossary

Terms and definitions that pertain to real teens of history

 

activist

noun

a person who campaigns to bring about political or social change

boycott

verb

to refuse, as an act of protest, to participate in a certain event or buy particular products

strike

noun

an organized effort by employees who refuse to work until certain conditions are met by their employer

protest

verb

to express an objection against an idea, an act, or a way of doing things

segregation

noun

the separation of people by race, ethnic group, gender, or class

sit-in

noun

a protest in which people seat themselves somewhere and refuse to move until their demands are met

James D. Morgan/Getty Images for The Growth Faculty (Top Malala Yousafzai); Bettmann/Getty Images (free speech teens); Rudolph Faircloth/AP Images (classroom), Gluekit (photo colorization); Illustration by Allan Davey (child worker); Courtesy Sarah Kaminsky (forging materials); Anne Frank Fonds Basel/Getty Images (Anne Frank); ullstein bild via Getty Images (Louis Braille); DEA/G. DAGLI ORTI/De Agostini/Getty Images (King Tut); Richard Stonehouse/Getty Images (Bottom Malala Yousafzai)