Junior Scholastic Teaching Kits

Teacher-approved stories, resources, and worksheets, courtesy of Junior Scholastic, the middle school Social Studies classroom magazine.

Featured Teaching Kits

Teacher-approved stories, resources, and worksheets for teaching middle school civics in your classroom, courtesy of Junior Scholastic, the middle school Social Studies classroom magazine

The First Amendment and You

Can Facebook censor me? Can I say what I want at school? Is my town’s curfew legal? The First Amendment safeguards Americans’ most important individual freedoms, but how do those freedoms apply to students?

Read the Story
Know the News
Answer multiple-choice questions about the article.
Get Worksheet
Lesson Plan
A step-by-step guide to teaching this article in your classroom
Get Lesson Plan

Why Voting Matters

A state election in Virginia showed that even one vote can determine an election’s outcome. What happens when an election is too close to call?

Read the Story
Close-Reading Questions
Use the article to answer the questions.
Get Worksheet
Sum It Up
Write an objective summary of the article.
Get Worksheet
Lesson Plan
A step-by-step guide to teaching this article in your classroom
Get Lesson Plan

Student Activism in Action

The Parkland, Florida, school shooting in April 2018 prompted a surge of activism among students nationwide. Students across the country are demanding action on guns. Can these young people dominate the debate on guns in America?

Read the Story
Know the News
Answer multiple-choice questions about the article.
Get Worksheet
Lesson Plan
A step-by-step guide to teaching this article in your classroom
Get Lesson Plan

Meet Teens in Office

Every day, teens across America ask themselves how they can make a difference. These four young people started changing their local governments—all before turning 20!

Know the News
Answer multiple-choice questions about the article.
Get Worksheet
Know the News
Answer multiple-choice questions about the article.
Get Worksheet
Prepare to Persuade
Plan a persuasive speech.
Get Worksheet
Prepare to Persuade
Plan a persuasive speech.
Get Worksheet
Lesson Plan
A step-by-step guide to teaching this article in your classroom
Get Lesson Plan
Lesson Plan
A step-by-step guide to teaching this article in your classroom
Get Lesson Plan

Want to see more from Junior Scholastic magazine?

Learn More

Quotes
 

Famous quotes about civics throughout history

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world. Indeed, it is the only thing that ever has.”

— Margaret Mead, cultural anthropologist and author

“Freedom is hammered out on the anvil of discussion, debate, and dissent.”

— Hubert H. Humphrey, 38th Vice President of the United States

“I know no safe depository of the ultimate powers of the society but the people themselves; and if we think them not enlightened enough to exercise their control with a wholesome discretion, the remedy is, not to take it from them, but to inform their discretion by education.”

— Thomas Jefferson, 3rd President of the United States

“The life of a republic lies certainly in the energy, virtue, and intelligence of its citizens.”

— Andrew Johnson, 17th President of the United States

Key Figures
 

Four civics figures who made an impact

James Madison

One of the nation’s founders, Madison helped craft the U.S. Constitution. He proposed the Bill of Rights to Congress in 1789 to protect basic freedoms such as the right to free speech. Madison served as U.S. president from 1809 to 1817.

Susan B. Anthony

A pioneer of women’s rights, Anthony believed women deserved the same freedoms as men and devoted her life to achieving that goal.  She established the National Woman Suffrage Association in 1869 and was arrested a few years later for attempting to vote. The 19th Amendment, granting women the right to vote, was ratified in 1920, 14 years after her death.

Martin Luther King Jr.

King was a civil rights leader who pushed to end segregation and discrimination against African Americans. He embraced the First Amendment’s protection of peaceful assembly, organizing nonviolent protests like the Montgomery, Alabama, bus boycott and the 1963 March on Washington. King was assassinated in 1968.

Sandra Day O’Connor

O’Connor became the first female U.S. Supreme Court justice in 1981. She held that position for more than 24 years before retiring. She often cast the deciding vote on important social issues. O’Connor is a vocal supporter of civic education.

Glossary

Terms and definitions that pertain to civics

civil liberty

noun

freedom from arbitrary governmental interference (as with the right of free speech), especially as guaranteed by the Bill of Rights

democracy

noun

a system of government in which power is held by the people of a country, typically exercised through elected representatives

First Amendment

noun

a part of the U.S. Constitution (and Bill of Rights) that protects freedom of religion, free speech, and other public expression

republic

noun

a form of government in which authority belongs to the people and their elected representatives

Second Amendment

noun

a part of the U.S. Constitution (and Bill of Rights) that deals with the “right of the people to keep and bear arms”

suffrage

noun

the right to vote

Explore Other Topics

Discover other free social studies topics and middle school teaching resources from Junior Scholastic magazine.

Masterfile (voters); Tetra Images/Alamy Stock Photo (pledge of allegiance); Illustration by Ryan Etter; Rhona Wise/AFP/Getty Images (student protests); Daniel Hertzberg (illustration); Everett - Art/Shutterstock.com (Madison); Sarin Images/Granger - All Rights Reserved (Susan B. Anthony); CNP/Hulton Archive/Getty images (MLK); Brooks Kraft/Corbis Historical/Getty (Sandra Day O'Connor)