KEY STANDARDS

Common Core: RH.6-8.1, RH.6-8.2, WHST.6-8.1, WHST.6-8.4

Before Reading

1. PRE-READING BRAINSTORM
(5 MINUTES)

Ask students: What are some ways teens can get involved in politics? Have volunteers share their ideas with the class.

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Read & Analyze

2. INDEPENDENT READING
(20 MINUTES)

Have students read the article on their own. While reading, students should underline each teen’s role in government and what initially attracted him or her to that position.


3. FULL-CLASS DISCUSSION
(20 MINUTES)

Use these questions to guide a text-based discussion.

  • Does Brandon think his age helped or hurt him? Why? (He thinks his age was an asset because people appreciated his youthful energy and that he was stepping up.)

  • What have been some of Brandon’s accomplishments in office? (He oversaw the demolition of abandoned properties, the conversion of old railroad tracks into a trail, and the restoration of a park.)

  • What were Susan Wu’s concerns about the gentrification of her neighborhood? (She was concerned that as wealthier people moved in, long-time residents and businesses wouldn’t be able to survive.)

  • Why does Katie Cox say it’s important for teens to be politically active? Do you agree? (She says teens need to be responsible for what will happen during their futures. Answers will vary.)

  • Was Caleb Owens’s slogan “Young but ready” effective? Explain. (Answers will vary—students may or may not think it was wise of him to use his age as a selling point.)

Extend & Assess

4. SPEECH WRITING
As a class, read the Core Question at the end of the article. Have students use the skils sheet Argument Writing: Prepare to Persuade to plan their speecs before completing a draft.

DIFFERENTIATING

Lower Level Have students read just one of the profiles, then teach a partner about that teen.

Higher Level Have students conduct research to find another teen who has run for a local office. Students should write a brief summary of that teen’s accomplishments.

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