LEARNING OBJECTIVE

Students will analyze primary sources related to an article.

KEY STANDARDS

RH.6-8.1, RH.6-8.2, RH.6-8.3, RH.6-8.9, RI.6-8.7, SL.6-8.1

CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS

 • Incorporate this article into a unit on the U.S. Constitution and amendments.

 • Use this article to spark a discussion about social activism, civic responsibility, and/or women’s rights.

Before Reading

WATCH A VIDEO
Show the video at junior.scholastic.com about women’s rights. Have students jot down what they learned.

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Read & Analyze

INDEPENDENT READING
(15 MINUTES)

Have students read the article on their own, writing down any comments or questions.

FULL-CLASS DISCUSSION
(15 MINUTES)

Use these questions to guide a discussion.

• What are some arguments for and against the ERA?
(Supporters of the ERA say it’s necessary to prevent discrimination against women and guarantee equal opportunities. Opponents say laws already protect women’s rights.)

• How are constitutional amendments ratified?
(Two-thirds of both chambers of Congress must agree on a proposed amendment, then three-quarters of the states must ratify it.)

Extend & Assess

ANALYZE A PRIMARY SOURCE
Have students complete the primary source skills sheet that accompanies this article: “All Men and Women Are Created Equal.” Then discuss as a class how the ERA fits into the larger context of women’s fight for equality throughout history.

CIVIC RESPONSIBILITY

Ask students to think of an issue they feel strongly about, and how they could get involved. Invite students who support the ERA to sign the Yellow Roses’ petition: change.org/o/the_yellow_roses_era.

DIFFERENTIATING

Lower Level Before reading the article, discuss the history of women’s rights in the U.S.

Higher Level Have students find another primary source related to women’s rights.

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PHOTO CREDITS TK