LEARNING OBJECTIVE

Students will be able to identify key responsibilities of U.S. presidents as outlined in the U.S. Constitution.

KEY STANDARDS

RH.6-8.2, RH.6-8.7, RI.6-8.3, RI.6-8.7

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CURRICULUM CONNECTIONS

• Incorporate this video into a lesson on how the U.S. government works.

• Use this video to launch a discussion about presidential powers.

Before Reading

STUDENT ENGAGEMENT
(5 MINUTES)

Tell students that they’re about to watch a video about the key roles and responsibilities of U.S. presidents. Ask: What examples of those roles and responsibilities can you think of?

Read & Analyze

WATCH AS A CLASS
(5 MINUTES)

Have students watch the video as a class. Before screening, advise them to pay attention to the examples given for each role.

CLOSE-VIEWING QUESTIONS
(15 MINUTES)

Have students write their answers to each question, or use these prompts to guide a discussion.

• DRAWING CONCLUSIONS: Why do you suppose the Constitution gives the role of foreign policy head to the president instead of to Congress?
(There is no one leader in Congress. Having a single person meet with foreign leaders and set foreign-policy goals is more effective than several persons who might not agree with each other.)

• NOTING DETAILS: How does the way each of president is shown in the video help illustrate the role being discussed?
(Each is shown performing one of the duties being discussed—for instance, John F. Kennedy is shown signing a bill into law when that role is mentioned, and George W. Bush appears with Queen Elizabeth of the United Kingdom to illustrate the head of state role.)

Extend & Assess

FEATURED SKILL: CRITICAL THINKING/MEDIA LITERACY

Reinforce students’ critical-thinking skills by assigning the skills sheet Critical Thinking/Media Literacy: Tuning In: Jobs of the President. Give them time to read through the questions, then watch the video again, perhaps pausing at key moments so they can take notes for writing their answer the questions.

RESEARCH
Hone students’ media literacy and research skills and supplement their understanding of the U.S. presidency by having them complete the skills sheet Identifying Steps in a Process: Becoming a U.S. President.

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